In The News

Charles W. Bone Honored at Annual "Good Guys" Awards

The Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee honored four men who have been outstanding advocates of women, women’s issues and the community as “Good Guys”. The men honored at this year’s event include:

  • Charles W. Bone, founder and chairman, Bone McAllester Norton PLLC
  • Lowe Finney, senator, Tennessee General Assembly
  • Bill Haslam, governor, State of Tennessee
  • Joseph R. Hyde, III, owner and president, Pittco Holdings Inc.

The Good Guys Award, celebrating its 20th anniversary, is the ultimate recognition which honors men who uniquely promote and support women. Over the past 20 years the Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee has recognized 73 men who have worked to promote, support and expand women’s roles in the community.  These men include elected officials, official appointees, community leaders, philanthropists and businessmen. Previous Good Guys recipients include Governor Phil Bredesen, U.S. Senator Fred Thompson, Phil Ponder, Howard Gentry, Dave Cooley and many others.

“The Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee is thrilled to honor our four distinguished recipients for this year’s Good Guys Awards,” said WPCTN President Lane Rhodes.  “Each has displayed great commitment to women’s issues and supporting the growth and development of women as leaders in the community.  This is year is particularly special as we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Good Guys Awards and jointly recognize the advancement of women in the community and the men who support them.”

The Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee is a multi-partisan, multi-ethnic organization that promotes full and equal participation of women in government and the political process. To learn more about the Collaborative, log on to http://www.wpctn.com.

Charles W. Bone To Be Honored at Annual "Good Guys" Awards

The Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee will honor four men who have been outstanding advocates of women, women’s issues and the community as “Good Guys” on Monday, October 15, 2012, 6:00 p.m. at the Loews Vanderbilt Hotel. The men honored at this year’s event include:
  • Charles W. Bone, founder and chairman, Bone McAllester Norton PLLC
  • Lowe Finney, senator, Tennessee General Assembly
  • Bill Haslam, governor, State of Tennessee
  • Joseph R. Hyde, III, owner and president, Pittco Holdings Inc.
The Good Guys Award, celebrating its 20th anniversary, is the ultimate recognition which honors men who uniquely promote and support women. Over the past 20 years the Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee has recognized 73 men who have worked to promote, support and expand women’s roles in the community.  These men include elected officials, official appointees, community leaders, philanthropists and businessmen. Previous Good Guys recipients include Governor Phil Bredesen, U.S. Senator Fred Thompson, Phil Ponder, Howard Gentry, Dave Cooley and many others.

“The Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee is thrilled to honor our four distinguished recipients for this year’s Good Guys Awards,” said WPCTN President Lane Rhodes.  “Each has displayed great commitment to women’s issues and supporting the growth and development of women as leaders in the community.  This is year is particularly special as we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Good Guys Awards and jointly recognize the advancement of women in the community and the men who support them.”

The Women’s Political Collaborative of Tennessee is a multi-partisan, multi-ethnic organization that promotes full and equal participation of women in government and the political process. To learn more about the Collaborative, log on to http://www.wpctn.com.

Charles Bone Named to Vanderbilt Center for Nashville Studies Advisory Board

Charles Bone is one of four community leaders to join the Advisory Board for the Vanderbilt Center for Nashville Studies. The advisory board members help set the center’s priorities and serve as ambassadors for the center’s mission.

The Vanderbilt Center for Nashville Studies facilitates research on community-identified issues and needs and provides timely recommendations on policy-level solutions and actions. This mission is carried out through research projects, university-community partnerships and conversations and collaborations. The center is particularly focused on four community-identified areas for 2010 through 2012: quality of life, the city's safety net, Nashville as a creative place, and community health.

Bone McAllester Norton to sponsor Conexión Américas breakfast

Bone McAllester Norton is honored to sponsor Conexión Américas as the organization celebrates its 10 year anniversary at the annual breakfast on Wednesday, May 30, 2012. Charles W. Bone co-chaired the annual breakfast in 2010, and Stephen Zralek co-chaired it in 2011 and is currently serving on the board of directors.

Every year, more than 2,500 Latino individuals and their families turn to Conexión Américas for assistance in achieving their American Dream. This year’s annual cafecito breakfast will feature Janet Murguía, President and CEO of the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), a powerful speaker and nationally recognized leader. Conexión Américas celebrates the 10th Anniversary of empowering Latino families in Middle Tennessee with a festive, inspiring morning gathering.

Wednesday, May

30th 7:45 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

The Loews Vanderbilt Hotel

BMN Attorneys,Trace Blackenship, Charles Bone, and Stephen Zralek, Named "Best of the Bar"

Bone McAllester Norton is pleased to announce that three members of our firm are among 30 lawyers in Middle Tennessee named to the Nashville Business Journal's 2010 “Best of the Bar.”


 Nominated by peers and chosen by a panel of judges, these attorneys were selected for their commitment to their clients, dedication to their respective areas of the law, and their respect and professionalism toward their peers and chosen profession.


Honorees from Bone McAllester Norton are Charles Bone and Stephen Zralek in the category Outstanding Small Law Firm and Trace Blankenship for Rising Star.

BMN Attorneys,Trace Blackenship, Charles Bone, and Stephen Zralek, Named "Best of the Bar"

Bone McAllester Norton is pleased to announce that three members of our firm are among 30 lawyers in Middle Tennessee named to the Nashville Business Journal's 2010 “Best of the Bar.”

 Nominated by peers and chosen by a panel of judges, these attorneys were selected for their commitment to their clients, dedication to their respective areas of the law, and their respect and professionalism toward their peers and chosen profession.

Honorees from Bone McAllester Norton are Charles Bone and Stephen Zralek in the category Outstanding Small Law Firm and Trace Blankenship for Rising Star.

CommunityNashville Names Charles Bone as Honoree for 40th Annual Human Relations Award Dinner

Bone McAllester Norton founder and chairman, Charles Bone was honored for making a difference at the 40th Annual CommunityNashville Human Relations Award Dinner.  He was honored along with Ellen and John Tighe, Rev. Neely Williams, Gail Kerr and the Jewish Federation of Nashville and Middle Tennessee.

The dinner raised money for the CommunityNashville Building Bridges Program at Oasis Center, which helps youth learn about themselves, to respect others and to understand the root causes of prejudice.

"The annual Human Relations Award Dinner is one of the biggest and most important events in our city recognizing outstanding individuals whose commitment to human rights makes Nashville a better place for all of us," said co-chair Art Rebrovick.

 

CommunityNashville Names Charles Bone as Honoree for 40th Annual Human Relations Award Dinner

Bone McAllester Norton founder and chairman, Charles Bone was honored for making a difference at the 40th Annual CommunityNashville Human Relations Award Dinner.  He was honored along with Ellen and John Tighe, Rev. Neely Williams, Gail Kerr and the Jewish Federation of Nashville and Middle Tennessee.

The dinner raised money for the CommunityNashville Building Bridges Program at Oasis Center, which helps youth learn about themselves, to respect others and to understand the root causes of prejudice.

"The annual Human Relations Award Dinner is one of the biggest and most important events in our city recognizing outstanding individuals whose commitment to human rights makes Nashville a better place for all of us," said co-chair Art Rebrovick.

 

June 2011 Newsletter Features New Attorney, Stephanie Taylor, Human Relations Award Dinner, Wildhorse Saloon, & Jackalope Brewing Company.

Bone McAllester Norton is thrilled to welcome Stephanie Taylor and congratulate Charles W. Bone on being honored for making a difference at the 40th Annual CommunityNashville Human Relations Award Dinner.  To read the rest of our newsletter, click here.

April 2011 Newsletter Features Human Rights Leaders, ATHENA, Top 40, Margaritaville, Real Estate, & Medical Records

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys continue to gain recognition in the Nashville community.  The firm also sponsored "Day on the Hill" Luncheon for the Tennessee Bankers Association Young Lawyers Division, and made sure to keep the theme fun.  To read the rest of our newsletter, click here.

Charles Bone Named One of Sumner County’s Top 30 Most Influential People

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that Charles Bone has been named one of Sumner’s 2010 Most Influential People.


Featured in the Tennessean, this list “reflects the diversity and variety of those who stand out as genuine movers and shakers in and around Sumner.”  No vote or survey was taken rather the editorial staff of The Hendersonville Star News, The News Examiner and Sumner A.M. selected these influential people that “one, either live in or work in, (or both), Sumer County and, two, that what they do touches the lives of many others.”


Charles Bone is currently active with the Transit Alliance of Middle Tennessee and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, as well as many other civic and charitable organizations.


Bone McAllester Norton congratulates Charles Bone on this well-deserved recognition.

Charles Bone Named One of Sumner County’s Top 30 Most Influential People

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that Charles Bone has been named one of Sumner’s 2010 Most Influential People.

Featured in the Tennessean, this list “reflects the diversity and variety of those who stand out as genuine movers and shakers in and around Sumner.”  No vote or survey was taken rather the editorial staff of The Hendersonville Star News, The News Examiner and Sumner A.M. selected these influential people that “one, either live in or work in, (or both), Sumer County and, two, that what they do touches the lives of many others.”

Charles Bone is currently active with the Transit Alliance of Middle Tennessee and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, as well as many other civic and charitable organizations.

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates Charles Bone on this well-deserved recognition.

Congratulations to Dean Institute Award Winner Trace Blankenship

Bone McAllester Norton Chairman Charles W. Bone and attorney Trace Blankenship congratulate Jack O. Bovender Jr. on receiving Lipscomb University’s first annual Dean Institute Award for Corporate Governance and Integrity.


“Jack Bovender is a perfect example of the type of leader we had in mind when Charles Bone, Trace Blankenship and I established the Dean Institute in 2008,” said Turney Stevens, dean of the Lipscomb University College of Business.


The Dean Institute for Corporate Governance and Integrity at Lipscomb University is a national forum for integrating best practices in governance with integrity and faith to benefit public and private company executives, board members and other top-tier corporate leaders. The institute seeks to address the root issues at play, namely, how character and integrity inform the decisions, actions, culture and performance of corporations.


Click here to read more.


 

Congratulations to Dean Institute Award Winner Trace Blankenship

Bone McAllester Norton Chairman Charles W. Bone and attorney Trace Blankenship congratulate Jack O. Bovender Jr. on receiving Lipscomb University’s first annual Dean Institute Award for Corporate Governance and Integrity.

“Jack Bovender is a perfect example of the type of leader we had in mind when Charles Bone, Trace Blankenship and I established the Dean Institute in 2008,” said Turney Stevens, dean of the Lipscomb University College of Business.

The Dean Institute for Corporate Governance and Integrity at Lipscomb University is a national forum for integrating best practices in governance with integrity and faith to benefit public and private company executives, board members and other top-tier corporate leaders. The institute seeks to address the root issues at play, namely, how character and integrity inform the decisions, actions, culture and performance of corporations.

Click here to read more.

 

Charles Bone, Charles Robert Bone, John Branham and Will Cheek recognized in Nashville Post's 2010 "In Charge" List

Nashville Post magazine launched its inaugural issue by featuring the 2010 “In Charge” list of “businesspeople and community leaders who are writing Music City’s success story.”   Among those recognized in the March/April edition as “making things happen in the Nashville area” are four Bone McAllester Norton attorneys.


As a leading authority on “gun ownership issues” and as “one of the city’s most well-rounded attorneys,” Will Cheek was named to the Nonprofits list.

Recognized for his legal career and as a “major player in Tennessee Democratic politics,” Charles Bone was named to the Legal list.

“A political force behind the scenes,” Charles Robert Bone was named to the Government / Politics list.

Recognized for his civil litigation practice,” John Branham was named to the Legal list.

Charles Bone, Charles Robert Bone, John Branham and Will Cheek recognized in Nashville Post's 2010 "In Charge" List

Nashville Post magazine launched its inaugural issue by featuring the 2010 “In Charge” list of “businesspeople and community leaders who are writing Music City’s success story.”   Among those recognized in the March/April edition as “making things happen in the Nashville area” are four Bone McAllester Norton attorneys.

As a leading authority on “gun ownership issues” and as “one of the city’s most well-rounded attorneys,” Will Cheek was named to the Nonprofits list.

Recognized for his legal career and as a “major player in Tennessee Democratic politics,” Charles Bone was named to the Legal list.

“A political force behind the scenes,” Charles Robert Bone was named to the Government / Politics list.

Recognized for his civil litigation practice,” John Branham was named to the Legal list.

“Sumner Should Remember Neal, Willis With Pride”

Charles W. Bone’s article was published in the "Tennessee Voices" section of the Tennessean on October 29, 2010.


Sumner should remember Neal, Willis with pride
By: Charles W. Bone


With the passing this week of Jim Neal, 2010 has seen the deaths of two of Nashville’s leading lawyers, both of them natives of Sumner County. William R. Willis Jr. also died this year, at the end of July.


Bill and Jim were born 18 months apart on farms only a dozen miles apart at the beginning of the Great Depression when the total population of Sumner County (now over 160,000) was only 33,000.


As a student at Vanderbilt in the 1960s, and a Sumner County native myself, I was privileged to meet Jim and Bill on separate occasions and found both of them proud of their Sumner County heritage.


Both had been raised on farms, as I had been. Jim grew up in Oak Grove in northern Sumner County and Bill’s family lived between Gallatin and Hendersonville.


Both had been outstanding students and veterans. Both were graduates of Vanderbilt University Law School where they had outstanding scholarship achievements.


As a college student, I found both of these men to be especially warm and encouraging about the legal profession, and their enthusiasm for not just the law but for politics, the community and their profession.


A few short years later, as a new young lawyer, I found them to be welcoming and challenging, depending on whether we were working together or on opposite sides of legal matters. Whatever the case, I always found I learned something about law and life from these prominent men.


The good works of Jim Neal and Bill Willis are well-known in this community. We know of Bill’s outstanding legal representation of The Tennessean, his service to the legal profession as the chair of the Board of Professional Responsibility, and his commitment to the work of Nashville Memorial Hospital and the Memorial Foundation.


Lives of great service


Jim became known around the world for his prosecution of Jimmy Hoffa, his participation in the Watergate trials, and the many other famous cases of his great career.


Both have been recognized for their many accomplishments by many different professional and civic organizations.


Men of this caliber can be tempted by success to become arrogant and disinterested in the lives of others, especially the lives of young people. Not so with Bill Willis and Jim Neal. I am especially thankful that these two fine lawyers took an interest in one other young man from Sumner County.


I was blessed by their willingness to befriend and mentor me as a person, and I know I am only one of many lawyers today who will always remember Bill Willis and Jim Neal as heroes of our profession and our community.


 

Charles W. Bone Featured in the Nashville Business Journal’s “Lessons from the Great Recession” Series

Community matters: Bone says leadership carries on beyond the bottom line


Nashville Business Journal "Lessons from the Great Recession"
October 29, 2010
By Brian Reisinger


Charles W. Bone started practicing law in a small office in Gallatin’s historic downtown, believed to be where President Andrew Jackson first hung his shingle as a country lawyer.


“I think that’s a lie,” Bone joked, still relishing the thought.


From those beginnings, the 64-year-old has built a career in law and local politics that has fueled change in the region and left him with a clear view of what matters in a battered economy. From a conference room overlooking downtown Nashville at his law firm Bone McAllester Norton – the ninth largest in the Nashville market – Bone took stock of the economy and Middle Tennessee’ future.


Two years out from the severe deepening of the Great Recession, Bone talked about the importance of reaching beyond what’s right in front of you. That can mean brokering a common goal or drawing a line on a controversial issue. The point is to take action.


His lessons:


1.  What’s good for your neighbor is good for you.


It wasn’t always as easy for Bone to make people sit up and listen as it is today.


One of his first prominent gigs was as attorney for Sumner County, a position that left him feeling Middle Tennessee was too fragmented in its thinking about economic development. He aimed to change that.


“What frustrated me ... was the lack of attention we got from Nashville,” Bone said.


He reached out to area leaders, building relationships and pushing common goals. Today, for instance, he’s a major force in the efforts of Mayor Karl Dean and others to pursue regional transit options.


From Bone’s perspective, Nashville isn’t competing with Franklin for corporate relocations or economic development projects. It’s competing with Austin, Texas, or Charlotte, N.C., and trying to make the world notice, he said.


That means moves like Jackson National Life Insurance Co. of Michigan expanding to Franklin or Nashville’s new Music City Center are a boon for everyone.  They provide jobs at the most critical time, he said, even if other parts of Middle Tennessee feel they’d better benefit from their own new company or project.


If that argument seems to have momentum among some leaders, it’s not for lack of players in government and economic development who think their particular area deserves more love. That, after all, is how it started out in Sumner County for Bone.


2.  Diversify your business.


Bone started as the proverbial “country lawyer” taking criminal cases, litigation and whatever else came his way. The high-rise office hasn’t changed his philosophy.


“My practice has been very diversified,” Bone said.


Therein lies a lesson that many business people value: Diversify your products, services or clients so you’ve got several streams of income. If one stumbles because of a change in the market, another may sustain you, even in an environment in which almost everyone is making less money.


From his roots as an attorney and official in Sumner County, Bone joined other firms and eventually started his own with colleagues in 2002. Bone’s practice has served bankers, entrepreneurs and nonprofits, and major clients of the firm include Fisk University.


Of course, many firms in the area pitch their range of services – arguing that they can meet a client’s every need – while others promote specialties. In general, law firms have found litigation and other work is sustaining them while the number and size of deals has languished in the poor economy.


With about 30 lawyers in his firm, Bone argues that his people can meet almost every need at a fair value. The point is to find a blend that works.


3.  Focus on community.


Community outreach may sound like what you do with your spare time, or money.


For Bone, it’s central to bolstering the regional economy – and it’s not always a feel-good pursuit.


He says it’s “amazing” to see all the varied nonprofits that help the area, with clear evidence in the flood response. Helping “people in great turmoil,” he said, improves their lives and in turn benefits everybody else participating in the same regional economy.


The same goes for issues fewer agree on. Bone thinks it’s important to oppose “English-only” workplace laws or Arizona-style immigration reform.


Those are economic development issues,” he said.


Bone joins other business leaders in opposing those proposals, but legislators pursuing such efforts have argued they protect business interests. In a way, Bone is used to a bit of political tumbling; he’s a Democrat, often serving clients who may be wary of his party’s intentions despite the pro-business work of some moderates locally.


Charles Bone
Age:
64
Title: Chairman
Company:  Bone McAllester Norton
Career highlights:  Attorney with various firms; Sumner County attorney; past president, Sumner County Bar Association; past member, Nashville Bar Association board of directors.


About the series
The Nashville Business Journal is talking to some of the most respected business leaders in Nashville about their most valuable business lessons learned from the Great Recession. 

Bone McAllester Norton Attorneys Charles Bone, Stephen Zralek and Trace Blakenship Named "Best of the Bar"

Bone McAllester Norton is pleased to announce that three members of our firm are among 30 lawyers in Middle Tennessee named to the Nashville Business Journal's 2010 “Best of the Bar.”


  Nominated by peers and chosen by a panel of judges, these attorneys were selected for their commitment to their clients, dedication to their respective areas of the law, and their respect and professionalism toward their peers and chosen profession.


Honorees from Bone McAllester Norton are Charles W. Bone and Stephen Zralek in the category Outstanding Small Law Firm and Trace Blankenship for Rising Star.


 

Bone McAllester Norton Attorneys Charles Bone, Stephen Zralek and Trace Blakenship Named "Best of the Bar"

Bone McAllester Norton is pleased to announce that three members of our firm are among 30 lawyers in Middle Tennessee named to the Nashville Business Journal's 2010 “Best of the Bar.”

  Nominated by peers and chosen by a panel of judges, these attorneys were selected for their commitment to their clients, dedication to their respective areas of the law, and their respect and professionalism toward their peers and chosen profession.

Honorees from Bone McAllester Norton are Charles W. Bone and Stephen Zralek in the category Outstanding Small Law Firm and Trace Blankenship for Rising Star.