In The News

Alcoholic Beverage Group Clients Featured in Nashville Business Journal

A Who’s Who of Nashville Craft Brewers
By Jamie McGee, Staff Writer- Nashville Business Journal
Four of our clients, including Turtle Anarchy Brewing Company, Jackalope Brewing Company, Black Abbey Brewing Company and Yazoo Brewing Company were featured in the "Who's Who of Nashville Craft Brewers.
Click here to read the entire story.
*subscription required

Bone McAllester Norton is Presenting Sponsor of the Nashville Business Journal's Entrepreneur Panel Series

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to be the  Presenting Sponsor of the Nashville Business Journal's 2012 Entrepreneur Panel Series, sponsored by LMBC and in cooperation with the Entrepreneur Center. The second panel in a three-series event is called "Financing Your Company" and the panel of experts will cover everything from seed and angel investing to private equity.
Bonelaw attorney, Charles Robert Bone is a panelist. He concentrates his practice in the areas of  transactions, corporate governance and advising governmental entities,  officers and directors, small businesses and entrepreneurs. In addition  to his law practice, Charles Robert has been instrumental in developing  several Tennessee-based companies as an investor and board member.
We invite you to attend.
Tuesday, May 15th

Renaissance Nashville Hotel
Registration 7:30 - 8:00 am
Breakfast & Panel Discussion 8:00 - 9:00 am
Ticket Price: $40
 
Charles Robert and the other leading experts will share tips on how get financing for your company at every stage of business. The event is designed to give entrepreneurs and business owners the advantages they need to succeed and will feature inspirational ideas, practical takeaways, and the best tools for growing their  businesses.

Nashville Pros Teach Entrepreneurs How to Beat the Odds

Nashville Business Journal by Chris Silva, Staff Reporter


Know your market. Eat, breathe and live it every day. Observe the room and be ready to adapt to your audience. Keep focused and don't broaden your concept too much.

These were just a few kernels of advice doled out by experts this morning during a Nashville Business Journal entrepreneur panel at the downtown Renaissance Hotel.

With resources like the Nashville Entrepreneur Center and the entrepreneurship centers at Belmont University, Vanderbilt   and other institutions, local business leaders feel Nashville is on course toward becoming one of the top destinations in the U.S. to start a company.

But with most new ventures failing in the first five years, how does an entrepreneur ensure his or her idea survives beyond the start-up phase?

"Have a real customer (and) choose your partners carefully," said Beth Chase, president and CEO of C3 Consulting. "A business partnership is like a marriage without the sex."

Michael Burcham, president and CEO of the Entrepreneur Center, said it's vital for entrepreneurs to have a clear focus and make sure they're not trying to solve the world's problems in one application.

"If you're not careful, you get so deep in the weeds and build products that no one cares about," Burcham said.

If you're starting a business, you must be prepared to be the first one in the office in the morning and the one taking the garbage to the dumpster when you're leaving, said Mark Montgomery, founder of FLO{thinkery}, a new company he formed to help new businesses get going and existing businesses grow.

"You have to really want it bad. It lives with you all the time," Montgomery said. "Great entrepreneurs lead by example. If you're going to be (one), you've got to be willing to take the trash out."

Trace Blankenship, an attorney with Bone McAllester Norton PLLC, rounded out the four-person panel.

When seeking out advisers, Blankenship suggested start-ups seek out people who don’t spew "over realism," are in tune with the business model and who are thinking about new possibilities during off-hours.

Burcham said body language is very important when meeting with mentors and potential investors, and said entrepreneurs should know their audience and “read” a room so they can adapt if the environment is potentially hostile.

Said Chase, "A lot of entrepreneurs aren't great sales people, but you've got to be able to look at your market and understand it."

Trace Blankenship and Charles Robert Bone Advise Entrepreneurs on "Beating the Odds"

Article by Chris Silva, Nashville Business Journal

Know your market. Eat, breathe and live it every day. Observe the room and be ready to adapt to your audience. Keep focused and don't broaden your concept too much.

These were just a few kernels of advice doled out by experts this morning during a Nashville Business Journal entrepreneur panel at the downtown Renaissance Hotel.

 

 

 

To read the entire, click here.

February 2012 Newsletter Features Entrepreneur Panel Series

Bone McAllester Norton to serve as a sponsor with the Nashville Business Journal to present its 2012 Entrepreneur Panel Series in cooperation with the Entrepreneur Center.   To read the rest of our newsletter, click here.

James Mackler listed on 2012's Forty under 40 list

Congratulations are in order for the Nashville Business Journal's Forty Under 40 class of 2012. We are so proud of our own James Mackler for making this year's list! The following 40 winners, first named during a reveal party Tuesday night at Nashville City Club were deemed to be making a difference in their companies and community by a panel of judges. All of the winners will be profiled in a special section of the March 9 edition of the Nashville Business Journal, with individual profiles following throughout the year. See the entire list here.  

James Mackler listed on 2012's Forty under 40 list

Congratulations are in order for the Nashville Business Journal's Forty Under 40 class of 2012. We are so proud of our own James Mackler for making this year's list! The following 40 winners, first named during a reveal party Tuesday night at Nashville City Club were deemed to be making a difference in their companies and community by a panel of judges. All of the winners will be profiled in a special section of the March 9 edition of the Nashville Business Journal, with individual profiles following throughout the year. See the entire list here.  

Haslam Announces Regional Entrepreneur Centers

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to be a Partner of the Nashville Entrepreneur Center.


Brian Reisinger


Staff Reporter - Nashville Business Journal


Gov. Bill Haslam has announced the business accelerators responsible for his regional entrepreneurship push, with the Nashville Entrepreneur Center landing a large portion of Middle Tennessee.


The Tennessee Republican has made entrepreneurship a central part of his economic development strategy. Commissioner Bill Hagerty of the state’s Economic and Community Development Department has been expected to announce the regional centers responsible for implementing Haslam’s strategy throughout the state.


Read the entire article here.


 

Haslam Announces Regional Entrepreneur Centers

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to be a Partner of the Nashville Entrepreneur Center.

Brian Reisinger

Staff Reporter - Nashville Business Journal

Gov. Bill Haslam has announced the business accelerators responsible for his regional entrepreneurship push, with the Nashville Entrepreneur Center landing a large portion of Middle Tennessee.

The Tennessee Republican has made entrepreneurship a central part of his economic development strategy. Commissioner Bill Hagerty of the state’s Economic and Community Development Department has been expected to announce the regional centers responsible for implementing Haslam’s strategy throughout the state.

Read the entire article here.

 

James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.


  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.


Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.


Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.


James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.

  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.

Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.

BMN Attorneys,Trace Blackenship, Charles Bone, and Stephen Zralek, Named "Best of the Bar"

Bone McAllester Norton is pleased to announce that three members of our firm are among 30 lawyers in Middle Tennessee named to the Nashville Business Journal's 2010 “Best of the Bar.”


 Nominated by peers and chosen by a panel of judges, these attorneys were selected for their commitment to their clients, dedication to their respective areas of the law, and their respect and professionalism toward their peers and chosen profession.


Honorees from Bone McAllester Norton are Charles Bone and Stephen Zralek in the category Outstanding Small Law Firm and Trace Blankenship for Rising Star.

BMN Attorneys,Trace Blackenship, Charles Bone, and Stephen Zralek, Named "Best of the Bar"

Bone McAllester Norton is pleased to announce that three members of our firm are among 30 lawyers in Middle Tennessee named to the Nashville Business Journal's 2010 “Best of the Bar.”

 Nominated by peers and chosen by a panel of judges, these attorneys were selected for their commitment to their clients, dedication to their respective areas of the law, and their respect and professionalism toward their peers and chosen profession.

Honorees from Bone McAllester Norton are Charles Bone and Stephen Zralek in the category Outstanding Small Law Firm and Trace Blankenship for Rising Star.

James Crumlin to Present at the Nashville Business Journal’s “HR Summit for a Changing Workplace”

Bone McAllester Norton attorney James Crumlin, along with five other panelists, will present challenges and demands for everyone, from the board and CEO to the entry-level employees at the Nashville Business Journal’s “HR Summit for a Changing Workplace.”


The breakfast and panel discussion will take place beginning at 7:30am on Tuesday, May 17 at the Hutton Hotel.


Click here for more details and to register.


 

James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.


  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.


Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.


Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.








 

James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.

  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.

Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.

 

David Anthony’s Blog Featured in the Nashville Business Journal

David Anthony and his legal blog, Creditor’s Rights 101, were featured in the December 24, 2010 edition of the Nashville Business Journal.


 The article, titled “Standing Out on the Web,” discussed the ways companies are using the internet and, in particular, blogs to promote their services and skills.


Mr. Anthony’s blog provides readers with a discussion and explanation of news and trends related to the collection of debt.


Click to read the Nashville Business Journal’s article, “Standing Out on the Web.”  (subscription required)


 

David Anthony’s Blog Featured in the Nashville Business Journal

David Anthony and his legal blog, Creditor’s Rights 101, were featured in the December 24, 2010 edition of the Nashville Business Journal.

 The article, titled “Standing Out on the Web,” discussed the ways companies are using the internet and, in particular, blogs to promote their services and skills.

Mr. Anthony’s blog provides readers with a discussion and explanation of news and trends related to the collection of debt.

Click to read the Nashville Business Journal’s article, “Standing Out on the Web.”  (subscription required)

 

Charles W. Bone Featured in the Nashville Business Journal’s “Lessons from the Great Recession” Series

Community matters: Bone says leadership carries on beyond the bottom line


Nashville Business Journal "Lessons from the Great Recession"
October 29, 2010
By Brian Reisinger


Charles W. Bone started practicing law in a small office in Gallatin’s historic downtown, believed to be where President Andrew Jackson first hung his shingle as a country lawyer.


“I think that’s a lie,” Bone joked, still relishing the thought.


From those beginnings, the 64-year-old has built a career in law and local politics that has fueled change in the region and left him with a clear view of what matters in a battered economy. From a conference room overlooking downtown Nashville at his law firm Bone McAllester Norton – the ninth largest in the Nashville market – Bone took stock of the economy and Middle Tennessee’ future.


Two years out from the severe deepening of the Great Recession, Bone talked about the importance of reaching beyond what’s right in front of you. That can mean brokering a common goal or drawing a line on a controversial issue. The point is to take action.


His lessons:


1.  What’s good for your neighbor is good for you.


It wasn’t always as easy for Bone to make people sit up and listen as it is today.


One of his first prominent gigs was as attorney for Sumner County, a position that left him feeling Middle Tennessee was too fragmented in its thinking about economic development. He aimed to change that.


“What frustrated me ... was the lack of attention we got from Nashville,” Bone said.


He reached out to area leaders, building relationships and pushing common goals. Today, for instance, he’s a major force in the efforts of Mayor Karl Dean and others to pursue regional transit options.


From Bone’s perspective, Nashville isn’t competing with Franklin for corporate relocations or economic development projects. It’s competing with Austin, Texas, or Charlotte, N.C., and trying to make the world notice, he said.


That means moves like Jackson National Life Insurance Co. of Michigan expanding to Franklin or Nashville’s new Music City Center are a boon for everyone.  They provide jobs at the most critical time, he said, even if other parts of Middle Tennessee feel they’d better benefit from their own new company or project.


If that argument seems to have momentum among some leaders, it’s not for lack of players in government and economic development who think their particular area deserves more love. That, after all, is how it started out in Sumner County for Bone.


2.  Diversify your business.


Bone started as the proverbial “country lawyer” taking criminal cases, litigation and whatever else came his way. The high-rise office hasn’t changed his philosophy.


“My practice has been very diversified,” Bone said.


Therein lies a lesson that many business people value: Diversify your products, services or clients so you’ve got several streams of income. If one stumbles because of a change in the market, another may sustain you, even in an environment in which almost everyone is making less money.


From his roots as an attorney and official in Sumner County, Bone joined other firms and eventually started his own with colleagues in 2002. Bone’s practice has served bankers, entrepreneurs and nonprofits, and major clients of the firm include Fisk University.


Of course, many firms in the area pitch their range of services – arguing that they can meet a client’s every need – while others promote specialties. In general, law firms have found litigation and other work is sustaining them while the number and size of deals has languished in the poor economy.


With about 30 lawyers in his firm, Bone argues that his people can meet almost every need at a fair value. The point is to find a blend that works.


3.  Focus on community.


Community outreach may sound like what you do with your spare time, or money.


For Bone, it’s central to bolstering the regional economy – and it’s not always a feel-good pursuit.


He says it’s “amazing” to see all the varied nonprofits that help the area, with clear evidence in the flood response. Helping “people in great turmoil,” he said, improves their lives and in turn benefits everybody else participating in the same regional economy.


The same goes for issues fewer agree on. Bone thinks it’s important to oppose “English-only” workplace laws or Arizona-style immigration reform.


Those are economic development issues,” he said.


Bone joins other business leaders in opposing those proposals, but legislators pursuing such efforts have argued they protect business interests. In a way, Bone is used to a bit of political tumbling; he’s a Democrat, often serving clients who may be wary of his party’s intentions despite the pro-business work of some moderates locally.


Charles Bone
Age:
64
Title: Chairman
Company:  Bone McAllester Norton
Career highlights:  Attorney with various firms; Sumner County attorney; past president, Sumner County Bar Association; past member, Nashville Bar Association board of directors.


About the series
The Nashville Business Journal is talking to some of the most respected business leaders in Nashville about their most valuable business lessons learned from the Great Recession. 

Bone McAllester Norton Attorneys Charles Bone, Stephen Zralek and Trace Blakenship Named "Best of the Bar"

Bone McAllester Norton is pleased to announce that three members of our firm are among 30 lawyers in Middle Tennessee named to the Nashville Business Journal's 2010 “Best of the Bar.”


  Nominated by peers and chosen by a panel of judges, these attorneys were selected for their commitment to their clients, dedication to their respective areas of the law, and their respect and professionalism toward their peers and chosen profession.


Honorees from Bone McAllester Norton are Charles W. Bone and Stephen Zralek in the category Outstanding Small Law Firm and Trace Blankenship for Rising Star.